PAGPFT. Hong Kong airport, NH Hotels, Hogg Robinson.

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FOXTROTS

 

 

Fox – sly.  Trots – left-leaning (Trotsky) plus its more insalubrious meaning. 

Foxtrots – leading the industry in a dance.

 

 

2009 February 23

People are getting paid to do this. Hong Kong airport, NH Hotels, Hogg Robinson.

 

 

1. People are getting paid for this:

 

Hong Kong airport frequently figures at the top of lists as the world’s or the region’s best airport. I have always disbelieved these. After a visit to the airport one month before it opened, I wrote about ‘A Design Disaster’.

 

Well, the designers have gone one step further. Is this the only airport in the world that requires passengers to change trains to get to some gates?! This, for a station concourse that is two floors down (then two up). And currently there are no signs for travellers to take escalators – they direct them just to the lifts – which do not have enough capacity for a train load…

 

 

 

2. People are getting paid for this:

 

I noted that Spain’s NH Hotels name for its new up-market brand, EdeNH, was a disaster. After all, probably the first criteria for a successful brandname is to select a word that can be said – in at least Spanish if not English. Try to say ‘EdeNH’ and you will understand.

 

The head of NH once said something similar to “It is Eden with NH at the end”; that is hardly a snappy name.

 

It has now been dropped. The official reason was that there are too many ‘Eden’ hotels around the world, so customers were unsure whether these were part of NH or not. I’m not sure I believe that…

 

But NH has chosen another brandname, for another type of hotel, a trendy one, starting with a hotel in Milan and to be followed by one in Berlin. I think that brandname, NHow, is as good as EdeNH was bad.

 

 

 

3. People are getting paid for this:

 

Hoggwash from Hogg Robinson, a business travel agency group:

 

-“…[Companies] will gain greater access to negotiated hotel rates.” I presume this means hotels will discount rates?

 

-“…pockets of growth…where demand [for hotel rooms] outstripped supply…[including] Abu Dhabi, Berlin, Moscow.” To me, demand greater than supply indicates occupancies of just below or just above 100%.

 

 

 

The Fox

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Hotel brandnames. My part in their success.

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FOXTROTS

 

 

Fox – sly.  Trots – left-leaning (Trotsky) plus its more insalubrious meaning. 

Foxtrots – leading the industry in a dance.

 

 

2009 February 19

Hotel brandnames. My part in their success.

I’ve had a string of successes with brandnames for hotel groups. True, no group has actually followed-up on my suggestion, but in this case I associate success with self-satisfaction.

Read the following, and I am sure you will agree. These are in no order:

 

[] Walk Inn. Proposed for Accor before it decided on a new name for its backpacker places. It chose ‘X Base Backpackers’ (really). But just look at the facts – starting with six in 2003, and targetting 30 inns for about 2008. Well, today it has 12, and Accor has distanced itself from the division. I suggested other names as well, such as Budgetel.

 

[] Concorde. For the Taj group, which has just announced its second brand (or third if you count Taj itself, which I suppose you should do; Ginger, Taj, and now Gateway). I didn’t actually attach it to a group of hotels at Taj, but I presume it would be a notch higher than Gateway.

Of course, I realise that others have got the Concorde name – Singapore-based HPL in Asia, and the Louvre group (sort of part of Starwood – Capital not Hotels). But neither is doing much with the name.

 

[] Also for Accor, I suggested Pullman is a better name than Sofitel for the group’s top-brand. Accor has decided to struggle along with Sofitel and will probably never ever change its mind. My argument is that Pullman is already established in minds of travellers as a top brand.

(I know the reason why Accor favours Sofitel over Pullman and will reveal all if a certain amount is paid into my favourite charity…)

 

[] Maybourne. The name Claridges chose for its rump hotel group after the Savoy was sold off. Three years later, and you can count the number of travellers who actually know the Maybourne name on the same number of fingers (x1000).

The reason for all this if that I’ve got another. This one is for the Singapore group, Millennium & Copthorne – which has some hotels under Millennium, and some under Copthorne, and a bunch of others.

One other is in Singapore, and was to be part of another division. It is M, rather obviously copying Starwood’s W. Well, five years on, and there is still only one M.

But the name should be ‘MC’, or maybe Emcee. Of course not only is this the initials of the M&C company, but it is also an acronym for Master of Ceremonies. Now, isn’t that a good description for a hotel group? Particularly if it seeks the MICE market?

(Or maybe the name should be MICE?…)

 

[] Tune Hotels. It is an Asia-based budget-hotel group. Why-oh-why did it not choose Tune Inn – now to be owned by me as a hotel services company?

 

 

The Fox

Occidental Hotels. Colour-me out-of-touch.

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FOXTROTS

 

 

Fox – sly.  Trots – left-leaning (Trotsky) plus its more insalubrious meaning. 

Foxtrots – leading the industry in a dance.

 

 

2009 February 12

Occidental Hotels. Colour-me out-of-touch.

A stay at an Occidental hotel in Spain has prompted me to make some comments about the company (and hotels in general) about their concern for the environment. They seem out of touch.

  Some comments:

-It has no policy for allowing guests to re-use its (generous) towels rather than washing them each day. We were obliged to lock them in our suitcase to prevent them being washed daily.

-Soap was replaced each second day.

-But there was dysfunction – one towel for double occupancy one day; empty shampoo taken but not replaced; on check-out day, room service wanted to clean room before departure – which would have required another visit after check-out.

  These would normally indicate a functional deficiency at the hotel, and probably the group. This leads me to expect that (because this deficiency is added to the problems of the crisis), the group will vanish in the next 2/3 years, probably into smarter AC or NH, or even losing-its-way Sol Melia.

 

 

 

 

The Fox

Crisis Market Monitor.

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FOXTROTS

 

 

Fox – sly.  Trots – left-leaning (Trotsky) plus its more insalubrious meaning. 

Foxtrots – leading the industry in a dance.

 

 

2009 February 10

Crisis Market Monitor.

Excerpt from Travel Business Analyst, Europe edition.

Data shown here may also be shown differently in the Travel Business Analyst newsletters. Not all sources shown, for reasons of brevity; not shown are usually relevant principals.

 

• World travel stocks index: Sep 57; Oct 47; Nov 43. TBA.

• Industry air traffic (RPKs): Sep -2.9%; Oct -1.3%; Nov -4.6%. IATA.

• Europe airlines international seat sales: Sep -1.6%; Oct -1.6%; est Nov -5%. AEA.

• Europe airport passengers: Sep -2.9%; intl -2.0%. ACI.

• Europe hotel occupancy: Sep -0.7pts; Oct -4.3pts. TBA.

• Europe air traffic (RPKs), Sep: -0.5%. Oct: +1.8%; Nov -3.4%. IATA.

• Europe travel stocks index: Sep 50; Oct 42; Nov 42. TBA.

• AsPac airlines international seat sales: Sep -8.2%. AAPA.

• AsPac hotel occupancy: Sep -8.0pts; Oct -5.3pts. TBA.

• AsPac air traffic (RPKs): Sep -6.8%; Oct -6.1%; Nov -9.7%. IATA.

• AsPac travel stocks index: Sep 73; Oct 57; Nov 53. TBA.

• Aeroflot seat sales: Nov +10.3%.

• Air France seat sales: Sep -1.5% (Eur/dom -2.5%); Oct +5.7% (E/d +3.7%);

Nov -5.2% (E/d -7.7%).

• American Airlines seat sales: Sep -10.0%; Oct -9.1%; Nov -15.9%.

• Australia resident departures: Sep +2.7%. PATA.

• Berlin hotels: Sep occupancy -1.8pts, rate +0.6%; Oct O -3.5pts R +7.6%; Nov

O -7.5pts R -4.6%. TRI.

• Berlin Tegel airport passengers: Sep +5.7%.

• British Airways seat sales: Sep -5.6% (Eur/dom -5.9%); Oct -5.6% (E/d -6.5%);

Nov -7.8% (E/d -9.3%).

• Cathay Pacific seat sales: Sep -0.7%; Oct +2.6%; Nov -2.2%.

• Delta Airlines seat sales: Sep -4.6%, Oct -4.8%; Nov -7.5%.

• Frankfurt airport passengers: Sep -3.9%.

• Japan Airlines seat sales Europe: Sep -20.5%; Oct -20.3%.

• Japan citizen departures: Sep -9.7%; Oct -9.5%. PATA.

• London airports international passengers: Sep Gatwick -6.5%, Heathrow -3.7%,

Stansted -5.1%. Oct LGW -10.4% LHR -3.7% STN -6.9%. Nov LGW -13.5% LHR

-4.3% STN -12.8%.

• London hotels: Sep occupancy -4.2pts, rate -1.9%; Oct O -3.1pts R -1.3%; Nov

O -5.4pts R -5.0%. TRI.

• Lufthansa seat sales: Sep +1.1% (Eur/dom -0.4%); Oct -1.4% (E/d -3.0%); Nov

-2.3% (E/d -3.5%).

• Paris CDG airport passengers: Sep -2.8%.

• Paris hotels: Sep occupancy -9.4pts, rate -9.8%; Oct O -5.5pts R -12.1%; Nov O

-9.4pts R +3.2%. TRI.

• Rome FCO airport passengers: Sep +5.7%.

• Singapore Airlines seat sales: Sep -1.6%; Oct +1.3%; Nov -6.1%.

• Southwest Airlines seat sales: Sep -8.1%; Oct +0.4%; Nov -10.7%.

• UK resident departures: Sep -7.6%; Oct -9.2%.

• UK visitor arrivals: Sep -11.2%; Oct +2.7%.

• United Airlines seat sales: Sep -7.9%; Oct -9.4%; Nov -17.8%.

• US hotel rooms construction abandoned, Nov: +75%. Smith.

• US hotels occupancy: Oct -6.5%; Nov -10.6%. Smith.

 

 

 

The Fox

Crisis Market Monitor.

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FOXTROTS

 

 

Fox – sly.  Trots – left-leaning (Trotsky) plus its more insalubrious meaning. 

Foxtrots – leading the industry in a dance.

 

 

2009 February 05

Crisis Market Monitor.

Excerpt from Travel Business Analyst, Asia Pacific edition.

Data shown here may also be shown differently in the Travel Business Analyst newsletters. Not all sources shown, for reasons of brevity; not shown are usually relevant principals.

 

• World travel stocks index: Sep 57; Oct 47; Nov 43. TBA.

• Industry IATA air traffic (RPKs): Sep -2.9%; Oct -1.3%; Nov -4.6%.

• AsPac airlines (AAPA) international seat sales: Sep -8.2%.

• AsPac hotel occupancy: Sep -8.0pts; Oct -5.3pts. TBA.

• AsPac IATA air traffic (RPKs): Sep -6.8%; Oct -6.1%; Nov -9.7%.

• AsPac travel stocks index: Sep 73; Oct 57; Nov 53. TBA.

• Australia resident departures: Sep +2.7%. PATA.

• Australia visitor arrivals: Sep -7.6%. PATA.

• Bali visitor arrivals: Sep +18.7; Oct +23.8%. PATA.

• Cathay Pacific seat sales: Sep -0.7%; Oct +2.6%; Nov -2.2%.

• China foreign visitor arrivals: Sep -15.1%; Oct -11.5%. PATA.

• China Southern seat sales: Sep -0.9%; Oct +8.3%; Nov +5.0%.

• Eva Air seat sales: Sep -14.3%; Oct -3.0%; Nov -9.0%.

• Hawaii visitor arrivals: Sep -18.5%; Oct -12.3%. PATA.

• Hong Kong airport passengers, Sep: -4.7%.

• Hong Kong visitor arrivals: Sep +3.5%; Oct -1.4%. PATA.

• India visitor arrivals, Sep: +1.5%. PATA.

• Japan Airlines seat sales: Sep transPacific -15.3% , Southeast Asia

-14.9% , systemwide -17.1%; Oct TP -9.3% , SA -10.6% , SW -12.8%.

• Japan travel agencies, top-63: Sep -8.4%; Oct -7.9%. TJI.

• Japan citizen departures: Sep -9.7%; Oct -9.5%. PATA.

• Japan visitor arrivals: Sep -6.9%; Oct -5.9%. PATA.

• Jet Airways seat sales, Oct: -1.7%.

• Korea resident departures: Sep -12.1%; Oct -5.8%. PATA.

• Korea visitor arrivals: Sep +5.4%; Oct +0.7%. PATA.

• Macau visitor arrivals: Sep +2.1%; Oct +2.2%.

• Malaysia visitor arrivals: Sep -0.1%; Oct +9.0%. PATA.

• Maldives visitor arrivals: Sep +4.6%; Oct -4.0%. PATA.

• New Zealand visitor arrivals: Sep -6.6%; Oct -3.3%. PATA.

• Qantas Group seat sales, Sep: -0.2%.

• Singapore air passengers, Sep: -0.3%.

• Singapore Airlines seat sales: Sep -1.6%; Oct +1.3%; Nov -6.1%.

• Singapore airport passengers: Sep -0.4%; Oct +1.8%; Nov -3.2%.

• Singapore visitor arrivals: Sep -4.1%; Oct -8.1%.

• Taiwan resident departures: Sep -13.3%; Oct -4.9%. PATA.

• Thai Airways seat sales, Oct: -12.2%.

• Thailand visitor arrivals: Sep -20.7%; Oct -11.1%. PATA.

• Tokyo Narita airport passengers, Sep: -10.1%.

• US hotel rooms construction abandoned, Nov: +75%. Smith.

• US hotels occupancy: Oct -6.5%; Nov -10.6%. Smith.

• Vietnam visitor arrivals: Sep -20.0%; Oct -10.8%; Nov -17.7%. PATA.

 

 

 

The Fox

Crisis Market Monitor.

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FOXTROTS

 

 

Fox – sly.  Trots – left-leaning (Trotsky) plus its more insalubrious meaning. 

Foxtrots – leading the industry in a dance.

 

 

2009 February 01

Crisis Market Monitor.

Excerpt from Travel Business Analyst, Europe edition.

Data shown here may also be shown differently in the Travel Business Analyst newsletters. Not all sources shown, for reasons of brevity; not shown are usually relevant principals.

 

• World travel stocks index: Sep 57; Oct 47.

• Industry IATA air traffic (RPKs): Sep -2.9%; Oct -1.3%.

• Europe travel stocks index: Sep 50; Oct 42.

• Europe airlines (AEA) international seat sales, Sep: -1.6%.

• Europe IATA air traffic (RPKs), Sep: -0.5%. Oct: +1.8%.

• US hotels Oct: occupancy -6.5%; rate -0.5%.

• US Thanksgiving holiday; trips -1.4%.

• AsPac travel stocks index: Sep 73; Oct 57.

• AsPac IATA air traffic (RPKs), Sep: -6.8%. Oct: -6.1%.

• Air France seat sales: Sep -1.5% (Eur/dom -2.5%); Oct

+5.7% (Eur/dom +3.7%).

• British Airways seat sales: Sep -5.6% (Eur/dom -5.9%); Oct

-5.6% (Eur/dom -6.5%).

• Cathay Pacific seat sales: Sep -0.7%; Oct +2.6%.

• Hong Kong visitor arrivals: Sep +3.5%; Oct -1.4%.

• Italy hotels, Oct: occupancy -13%, rate -9%.

• Japan citizen departures: Sep -9.7%; Oct -9.5%.

• Japan Airlines seat sales, Sep: Europe -20.5%.

• Jet Blue Airlines ‘traffic’, Oct: -4.5%.

• London airports international passengers: Sep Gatwick

-6.5%; Heathrow -3.7%; Stansted -5.1%. Oct LGW -10.4%;

LHR -3.7%; STN -6.9%.

• London ‘luxury’ hotels Oct: occupancy -3.7%; rate -5.0%.

• Lufthansa seat sales: Sep -0.4% (Eur/dom -0.4%); Oct

-3.2% (Eur/dom -3.0%).

• New York ‘luxury’ hotels Oct: occupancy -5.7%; rate -6.5%.

• Singapore Airlines seat sales: Sep -1.6%; Oct +1.3%.

• Southwest Airlines seat sales: Sep -8.1%; Oct +0.4%; est

Nov -8%.

• United Airlines seat sales: Sep -7.9%; Oct -9.4%; est Nov -18%.

 

 

 

The Fox